Tag Archives: war movie

“American Sniper” a modern American fable

Much like Achilles from Ancient Greek mythology, the story of Chris Kyle is presented in Clint Eastwood’s thrilling film as one of growth and acceptance, the tale of a warrior who fights the battle, returns home and must adjust to his new life. It is a classic story, but also a timeless one.

Chris Kyle (Bradley Cooper) is a Navy SEAL who takes his expert marksmanship to the war in Iraq. As he becomes the best sharpshooter in American history, with a body count reaching into the hundreds, he struggles to adjust to his family life with his wife Taya (Sienna Miller) and kids, not understanding the toll that his desire to help his comrades takes.

A simple PTSD story is in itself not that new or interesting, but what Eastwood and screenwriter Jason Hall manage to create is something more than that. By basing the film on a mythical structure and viewing Kyle as the prototypical warrior sent to defend the homeland, they make something universal. By taking that same story and molding it around current events, they give the film greater meaning. The two together paint a picture of a highly relatable man that defines an American era.

It is not surprising that the film made so much money as it appeals to so many people. Regardless of its historical accuracy, it presents us with the American ideals we strive for and the cost those ideals take. It gives us the American hero we all root for and the flaws in him that we feel in us.

It is not a perfect film. The story is not that original when taken solely at its plot. The Iraqis in the film are not given full representation and are often marginalized. And it’s not as though there are any real surprises throughout the film. It’s pretty easy to see the plot points before they happen. When compared to other war films, it’s not even the best war film about the recent Iraq/Afghanistan wars (“The Hurt Locker” and “Zero Dark Thirty” are superior in my opinion).

It does strike a core though, right in the American spirit. It is a great example of the sacrifice for freedom, something that will always be an American ideal.

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‘Dunkirk’ a non-stop adventure

From the first frame of “Dunkirk”, the action doesn’t stop until the film’s conclusion. Just under two hours long, the film is a breathtaking war story that never lets its foot off the gas pedal.

400,000 soldiers are stranded off the coast of France in Dunkirk, their home of England visible just over the channel, but they can’t get there. German planes are picking them off on flybys and the enemy army is steadily advancing in on them. The film follows three sets of characters; one set on land, led by young Tommy (Fion Whitehead) trying to survive on the beach, one in the air, led by Farrier (Tom Hardy) trying to protect the troops on the ground from German aircraft, and one coming in from the sea, a commercial yacht piloted by Mr. Dawson (Mark Rylance), tasked with trying to rescue the troops. Commander Bolton (Kenneth Branagh) on the beach overlooks the entire operation with despair and yet a slim ray of hope; perhaps rescue will come from home.

Written and directed by Christopher Nolan, the film is a tale of tension rather than carnage. It is rated PG-13 so the blood and massacre of other war films is not as omnipresent or visual. This is rather a story of avoiding that horror.

Time plays a central element in the narrative, always seemingly ticking in the background. The time of the incoming tide, characters constantly checking their watches, Farrier’s declining fuel supply in his fighter jet; all tick by over the course of the story. This ratchets up the tension as we clock down to the possible annihilation of our heroes.

The film really puts you in the situation. Through the wide and precise cinematography and deafening sound (it may be the loudest movie I’ve ever seen), the war and dread come to life. Everything in the film appears shockingly real. Though we know there are visual effects, they are hard to point out in comparison to so many other films who blatantly use CGI, but in a way that points to the effect being man made.

The story is relatively simple, and there are seemingly barely 50 lines of dialogue in the whole film. It is really more about story told through action, and the film keeps going at full-speed the entire time, barely letting the audience catch their breath. This is both well-done and a bit overdone.

The film is not so much about war, but about determination, representative of the defiant British spirit. It is a story of perseverance in the face of slim odds, told in grand yet intimate scale. The three different storylines intersect at the conclusion in a grand rescue that gives meaning to Winston Churchill’s famous “We shall fight on the beaches” speech.