Tag Archives: tom hardy

‘Dunkirk’ a non-stop adventure

From the first frame of “Dunkirk”, the action doesn’t stop until the film’s conclusion. Just under two hours long, the film is a breathtaking war story that never lets its foot off the gas pedal.

400,000 soldiers are stranded off the coast of France in Dunkirk, their home of England visible just over the channel, but they can’t get there. German planes are picking them off on flybys and the enemy army is steadily advancing in on them. The film follows three sets of characters; one set on land, led by young Tommy (Fion Whitehead) trying to survive on the beach, one in the air, led by Farrier (Tom Hardy) trying to protect the troops on the ground from German aircraft, and one coming in from the sea, a commercial yacht piloted by Mr. Dawson (Mark Rylance), tasked with trying to rescue the troops. Commander Bolton (Kenneth Branagh) on the beach overlooks the entire operation with despair and yet a slim ray of hope; perhaps rescue will come from home.

Written and directed by Christopher Nolan, the film is a tale of tension rather than carnage. It is rated PG-13 so the blood and massacre of other war films is not as omnipresent or visual. This is rather a story of avoiding that horror.

Time plays a central element in the narrative, always seemingly ticking in the background. The time of the incoming tide, characters constantly checking their watches, Farrier’s declining fuel supply in his fighter jet; all tick by over the course of the story. This ratchets up the tension as we clock down to the possible annihilation of our heroes.

The film really puts you in the situation. Through the wide and precise cinematography and deafening sound (it may be the loudest movie I’ve ever seen), the war and dread come to life. Everything in the film appears shockingly real. Though we know there are visual effects, they are hard to point out in comparison to so many other films who blatantly use CGI, but in a way that points to the effect being man made.

The story is relatively simple, and there are seemingly barely 50 lines of dialogue in the whole film. It is really more about story told through action, and the film keeps going at full-speed the entire time, barely letting the audience catch their breath. This is both well-done and a bit overdone.

The film is not so much about war, but about determination, representative of the defiant British spirit. It is a story of perseverance in the face of slim odds, told in grand yet intimate scale. The three different storylines intersect at the conclusion in a grand rescue that gives meaning to Winston Churchill’s famous “We shall fight on the beaches” speech.

The Best 25 Movies of the Last 25 Years Part 1

It was my brother’s 25th birthday last month and that got me thinking about the past quarter-century of moviemaking. When thinking about this list, I was surprised by an apparent lack of surefire classics comparative to other decades which may speak to Hollywood playing it far too safe recently, but I still had to make several painful cuts (sorry “Shawshank” and “Pan’s Labyrinth”). And there are still some very, very good movies here.  So without further ado, here are my top 25 films of the past 25 years (1992-2017).

25. Under the Skin (2014)

    A haunting look into the human experience, “Under the Skin” burrows into your psyche, making you wonder about the nature of existence. Jonathan Glazer’s film takes you into the mind of an alien (Scarlett Johansson) with no concept of human interaction and makes you experience life as if you were witnessing it for the first time, something not easy to do. It is truly surreal, beautiful and grotesque all at the same time.

24. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004)

    Any number of Charlie Kauffman’s scripted-films could be on this list (“Adaptation”, “Being John Malkovich”), but I’ve decided to go with the film that most remember him for. Focusing on a guy (Jim Carrey) and a girl (Kate Winslet) after a rough breakup, they each undergo an experimental procedure to remove their memories of each other, but each memory needs to be individually extracted, and we watch their history in reverse order, seeing their evolution. A deeper project that explores the nature of love and memory and all the pain and joy that it brings, “Eternal Sunshine” perfectly balances the weird, the sweet and the comical into one film.

23. Fight Club (1999)

    “Fight Club” may be the signature anarchist film. Infused with creativity, the film, even twenty years after its release, is still a jaw-dropping experience of sheer ingenuity. It tells the story of the Narrator (Edward Norton) who meets a strange man selling soap named Tyler Durden (Brad Pitt). Stuck at a dead-end job and working for corporate America, the Narrator needs to break out and with Tyler, they create Fight Club, a group that revels in simply beating each other night after night. But the club grows and grows, becoming something else entirely and something very wrong begins to affect the Narrator. Creating an avalanche of pop culture references and helping give rise to 1990s counterculture, the film is glossy and fun with an edge that burns in just the right way.

22. Three Colors Trilogy (1993-94)

Perhaps the most “classical” of any of the films on this list, Krzysztof Kieslowski’s three films (Blue, White and Red) illuminate the different themes of French nationalism: liberty, equality and fraternity. Whether it is the story of a wife who must come to grips with the death of her husband and daughter in a car accident, a man who is divorced because he can not consummate his marriage or the relationship between two people who have nothing in common, the threads of connection between all three stories elevates them to a richer meaner. They are a moving canvass of life.

21. Mad Max: Fury Road (2015)

Despite being nearly non-stop action, “Mad Max: Fury Road” manages to imbue themes of environmentalism, loyalty, purpose and feminism into its narrative. With the world having fallen apart, Max (Tom Hardy) is alone, but finds himself abducted by a clan of biker gang thugs who take him a sprawling community dependent on a tyrant named Immortan Joe (Hugh Keays-Byrne). When Joe’s concubines are abducted by one of his subordinates, Furiosa (Charlize Theron), Max finds himself entangled in a predicament that appeals to his sense of honor.  “Fury Road” is one of the greatest action movies ever made, a sprawling, thrilling chase through hell and perhaps a telling cautionary tale of our future.

20. 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days (2007)

A harrowing story of dedication, “4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days” tells the story of two college roommates, Otilia (Anamaria Marinca) and Gabriela (Laura Vasiliu), in Romania who arrange to have an illegal abortion. Directed by Cristian Mungiu, the film is told in near real-time and in gripping detail. It is a treasure of suspense brimming with real-world issues.

19. Zero Dark Thirty (2012)

The foremost signature event of the 21st century are the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Not far behind that is the death of the al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden. Told in gripping detail through the eyes of fictional CIA operative, Maya (Jessica Chastain) and directed by Kathryn Bigelow, the film is a timecapsule of the post-9/11 mentality and all the history involved with that period. The range and scope of the film is breathtaking and the conclusion told in real-time brings the history straight to us.

18. Eyes Wide Shut (1999)

The last film of the great Stanley Kubrick, “Eyes Wide Shut” is an eerie look into raw sexuality and the bonds of marriage. Even so-so Kubrick towers above the work of many other filmmakers, and the director’s swan song film is still a treasure that leaves open so many interpretations. Dr. Bill Harford (Tom Cruise) and his wife, Alice (Nicole Kidman) are sexually enticed by different people at a party in New York City. The episode leads to an admission by Alice that women are not as faithful to men as Bill would believe and the situation escalates as Bill is drawn into a world of sexual conquest, uninhibited desires and danger. It finds a way to dig under your skin in a way that is so purely Kubrick.

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Part 3

‘The Revenant’ a powerful film

Leonardo DiCaprio and co. went through hell to make “The Revenant.” The shoot was shot in sequence in difficult locations (originally in Canada, the crew was forced to go to Argentina in search of snow), the budget went over by multiple millions, the schedule for filming was extended from March until August (forcing actor Tom Hardy to drop from the planned “Suicide Squad” film) and many members of the crew quit. Director Alejandro González Iñárritu refused to use digital effects and to make the film shoot as real as possible to convey the feeling of survival after being left for dead.

Well, consider that one accomplishment of the movie.

“The Revenant” is indeed a story of survival as a fur trapper, Hugh Glass, is mauled by a bear and left for dead by one of his companions, John Fitzgerald (Tom Hardy). Seeking revenge for this and other affronts, Glass must overcome his wounds and brave the harsh winter wilderness to achieve his revenge.

Nature here is simultaneously gorgeous and horrific (DP Emmanuel Lubezki used only natural light for the film). It is unforgiving, but also not malevolent, given preference to no one, just simply being. In that way, Glass is facing his own power to endure as he is tested again and again.

The violence in the film is astounding, some of the most brutal and realistic to ever be on screen. As the confrontations between different Native American tribes, the French, the fur traders and the English all escalate (plus bears!), the viewer comes to realize that the film is stating that violence is inherently part of the human condition, as indisputable a force as nature’s abject cruelty. The strength of Glass’ spirit then is being tested against both of these unyielding forces, the inherent cruelty of man and the harshness of nature.

Another strong theme is that of children. The mother bear who attacks Glass is trying to protect her young. Glass himself has a half-Native American son. The fur the traders collect is meant to be used to feed their families. This caring for youth, the hope to pass safety and joy to the next generation, feeds the film with strength and heart. It gives motivation to Glass and others to endure the cold and the violence.

The film feels like a Native American fable, telling the simple story of a man risen from the dead who travels the wilderness to find revenge. The viewer can almost hear the narrator whisper the tale to them near a campfire. The openness of the plot leaves lots of room for interpretation into what exactly the theme of the film is, and Iñárritu does not tip his hand towards any definitive conclusions. This works towards the film’s betterment and detriment, for as beautiful and investing as the journey is, the viewer is left with a feeling of “What was that all for?” at the conclusion if they are unable to discern it’s meaning for themselves.

Nevertheless, in terms of filmmaking craft, the film is a masterpiece, a sprawling journey that illuminates camerawork, lighting, sound, visual effects, acting and writing. It’s a great movie spectacle, one that should not be missed for the serious film fan.

‘Mad Max: Fury Road’ one for the ages

At first glance, another Mad Max movie feels like Hollywood just reaching deeper into the apple barrel looking for more franchises to bring back from the dead. So what should an audience member expect from a film whose last entry was 30 years ago? Few would expect one of the best action movies of all-time.

The film starts in the middle of dystopia, the earth a desolate wasteland with few survivors. These survivors quickly organize themselves into gangs of biker-riding, flame throwing hooligans intent on waging war against each other and securing the most precious of resources: food, water, milk, gasoline and fertile women. Immortan Joe (Hugh Keays-Byrne) is the leader of one particular faction, having taken a number of wives.. These women however are stolen from him by Imperator Furiosa (Charlize Theron) who intends on taking them to a promised green land where they will be free from his rule.  Caught in the middle of this storm ,and just trying to survive, Max (Tom Hardy) finds himself forced into helping the freedom seeking women out of necessity.

The first thirty minutes of the film are nearly flawless, the camera seemingly delving straight into Max’s subconscious as the shots are quick, the effects loud and the score thundering. There is barely any dialogue as we are led into the realm of these road warriors as they pillage at a frantic pace yet the story is still conveyed to us dramatically.

Director George Miller, having directed the other Mad Max films, returns to the franchise seemingly determined to use modern technology to create the dystopia that he never could in the 1980s. Special adoration must also be given to editor Margaret Sixel, cinematographer John Seale and composer Junkie XL for creating such a strong cinematic environment.

The action scenes are so wonderfully done that you forgive the filmmakers for their occasional bloatedness. The combination of stunts, ingenuity and occasional CGI effects create breathtaking sequences.

Mad Max: Fury Road may be Hollywood again refusing to try anything new, but it is a breathtaking adventure film that should not only entertain fans of the original films, but the casual action film moviegoer. It is already an instant classic, one that people will reference for years and years.