Tag Archives: matt damon

‘The Martian’ a refreshing science tale

Directed by Ridley Scott, “The Martian” tells the tale of Mark Watney (Matt Damon), an astronaut presumed dead and left behind by his crew on the planet Mars after a sudden storm. Only Mark is still very much alive. Tasked with surviving the harsh Martian climate while trying to contact Earth for a rescue mission, Mark uses every scientific tool at his disposal, from creating fertile soil to digging up an old rover to connect with NASA.

“The Martian” feels like the third of a series of resurgent films on space, with “Gravity” (2013) and “Interstellar” (2014) coming before it. In comparison to those earlier films, “The Martian” is the lightest, filled more with the hope of success and scientific wonder than with pontificating on etherealism. So in that way, “The Martian” is more of a good-old-fashioned crowd-pleaser, enjoyable but somewhat more forgettable than “Gravity” or “Interstellar”.

Damon is very good in the title role, narrating what he is doing to a computer screen for record keeping and the rest of cast, including Jessica Chastain, Jeff Daniels, Kristen Wiig, Kate Mara and Michael Peña, are also solid.

What the film does have going for it is a contagious adoration of science. As Mark uses every single item at his disposal to make himself food, transportation and communication, the viewer is tickled to see so many science experiments come to life. In a way, it is the most exciting science fair put to screen, a film Bill Nye himself would stamp with approval.

What’s missing is a personal tug of emotion with Damon’s character. There’s no lover awaiting him on Earth or daughter without a father. His background is not examined and that is a missed opportunity to establish an audience connection, something that really makes you pull for him to get off Mars.

While some will consider the film just a version of “Cast Away” (1999) in space, there is a lot of technique and charm in Scott’s direction of the film. It is a thrilling, if light, ride.

‘Manchester by the Sea’ a miserable experience

Sitting through Manchester by the Sea is about the equivalent of a visit to the morgue. It is a joyless slog filled with despair, misery and regret.

Lee (Casey Affleck) is a janitor in Boston. When Lee’s brother, Joe (Kyle Chandler), dies from his heart condition, Lee is forced to return home to care for his nephew, Patrick (Lucas Hedges), a high school kid. Patrick is a  brat who juggles two different girls and just wants to get laid and stay in town. Lee tries to convince Patrick to move back with him to Boston and, over the course of the story, we learn why he doesn’t want to stay, as his tragic backstory involving his ex-wife, Randi (Michelle Williams), and his three children unfolds.

It is now common knowledge that drama movies are consistently rated higher by critics than comedies. As so, if the quality of Manchester by the Sea was translated into a comedy, it probably would have been panned, but since it is a ‘thought-provoking drama’, it gets Oscar-nominated instead. Just because a film has dramatic moments and deals with heavier issues does not mean that it is a quality work.

Sure, Casey Affleck is great in the lead role, and there are some good moments of the characters on boats, but the film is just a depressing experience. There are not enough happy moments to counteract the misery, and you don’t really care about the characters that much. With a bloated run time of over two hours, it’s just misery, misery, misery, leaving you unable to take anything from the experience.

For those looking for a good time at the movies, Manchester by the Sea is not for you. For those looking for a thought-provoking drama, Manchester is still not for you. For those who would like the equivalent of a battering ram to the heart for two hours with no apparent hope for the future, go see Manchester by the Sea. You’ll love it.