Tag Archives: chesley sullenberger

‘Sully’ a traditional, solid movie

“Sully” tells the story of the “Miracle on the Hudson,” where a commercial airliner, under the navigation of Chesley Sullenberger, performs an emergency landing on the Hudson River in New York City after it loses its engines in a bird strike.

Directed by Clint Eastwood, the film is a sturdy crowdpleaser, building up subtle moments to Sully’s vindication that he did indeed do the right thing. Tom Hanks is great in the central role, showing his unease about being called a hero and the exploration into that label from the world.

It is not especially showy, but that may be to the film’s betterment. Too often directors go for the big moments, showing off rather than letting the story speak for itself, but Eastwood has always gone with a very workmanlike approach, carefully constructing each moment to last as long as it needs to. The execution of the landing is wonderfully realized, using all of Eastwood’s cinematic technique.

If there is a detriment however, it is that there is not a lot of story to actually hold the film together. The crash landing occurs, there’s an investigation, the results of that investigation, and the end. It goes by rather breezily and barely clocks in at 90 minutes.

At its core, the film is about ordinary people doing extraordinary things, not necessarily as individual heroes, but collectively. It is a film worth remembering for substance rather than flash.