“Pitch Perfect 2” lacks harmony

Pitch Perfect (2011) is certainly not a great movie. It is a standard by the numbers film with some interesting, strong female characters. However, it seems fresh. There are independent women not reliant on male companions for success. The music and choreography are strong. There are funny moments and inside jokes that reward the audience. So there were strangely high expectations for the sequel. But comic sequels in general are hard nuts to crack, usually too dependent on the original, maintaining a joke’s original wit harder to pull off the second time around (just imagine creating a sequel for a joke you’ve already told). And so it is with Pitch Perfect 2, an all around bore of a film that succeeds at none of its predecessor’s strengths.

It’s been three years since the end of the last film. Beca (Anna Kendrick) is about to graduate and has taken an internship at a music producing studio. Her loyalties are split however by this new venture and her attachment to the Barden Bellas, a recent national disgrace who are competing for their survival at the world acapella championship. With the usual crew of Fat Amy (Rebel Wilson), Chloe (Brittany Snow) and newcomer Emily (Hailee Steinfeld), they must band together to get through this latest challenge.

Movies need their protagonists front and center. They are the heart and soul of a film who enable an audience to channel their emotions. So it is strange that Beca has very little time in the film. What could have been a somewhat interesting dilemma (loyalty to one’s friends and confronting the future) is watered down by a continuous need to keep returning to less interesting characters such as Emily or Fat Amy (who is given far, far, far too much screentime- she works as comic relief in spare moments, not with her own storyline). Beca’s boyfriend, Jesse (Skylar Astin), is in but a handful of scenes, and they have practically no plotline together, their relationship one of the true rocks of the first film. In essence, the heart is ripped out of the film right from the get go, and we are given nothing to feel for.

Nothing in the film feels earned, creating more disinterest. We don’t see Beca really struggle with the decision of whether or not to stick with her internship or the Barton Bellas so when she does work things out at a retreat it feels hollow.

Perhaps the greatest flaw of the film is its reliance on the first movie. The filmmakers seem intent on revisiting every single element of the previous film. They revisit Bumper (Adam DeVine) and Fat Amy’s romance, make up a lame excuse for Chloe to still be at school (she’s flunked some course three times), bring back Aubrey (Anna Camp) for a pointless cameo, have Gail (Elizabeth Banks) and John (John Michael Higgins) making the same commentary jokes and even have the same structure of the first outing (a new girl enters the Bellas after an embarrassment leaves the team scrambling and that same young recruit makes a mistake at a sing off where the team needs to reconnect with their purpose in order to prove to the world at a singing competition how united they are).

Comedy sequels are so hard to pull off. Caddyshack II (1988), Fletch Lives (1989), Blues Brothers 2000 (1998) and Arthur 2: On the Rocks (1988) are all testament to that. Audiences have forgotten them and so too will they will probably forget Pitch Perfect 2.

 

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