“The Post” a solid piece of craftsmanship

When a film’s writing, directing and acting all work together, the result, no matter the film’s other shortcomings, is poetry. “The Post” finds director Steven Spielberg with stars Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep and writers Josh Singer working together and balancing their talents to create a great film.

“The Post” focuses on the Washington Post’s decision on whether or not to publish the Pentagon papers, leaked classified documents that show that the United States knew the Vietnam War was unwinnable, but continued to send troops to die anyway. Kay Graham (Meryl Streep), the Post’s owner, must grapple with whether the risk of taking on the federal government is worth it to print the truth, a truth which hurts one of her dear friends, Robert McNamara (Bruce Greenwood). Meanwhile, editor Ben Bradlee (Tom Hanks) pushes to uphold the right of the freedom of the press despite the consequences.

The film is a taught examination of a single choice and the consequences that stem from that choice. It masterfully builds up the pressures put on the characters and uses their backstories to drive their actions, creating greater empathy and eventual repercussions. Hanks and Streep’s acting, along with Bob Odenkirk and the entire cast really, convey the desperation of their choices and the repercussions it could have for future journalists.

Spielberg has always focused on the simple actions of good people and the positive influence they can have on the world. Whether it be Oskar Schindler saving the Jews in his factory despite the risks or Abraham Lincoln choosing to liberate the slaves over peace or the platoon in “Saving Private Ryan” trekking across Europe to save Private Ryan despite the craziness of risking all their lives for one man. The Post’s decision to publish the papers sparks the same moral compass: the truth should win out. In a world of moral grayness, finding the right solution and sticking to that is what matters.

While Spielberg sometimes indulges in the cheerleader ra-ra moments of fist pumping that are unnecessary, his focused direction on the story and characters combined with his ability to infuse action with deeper meaning make the film breeze along and engage the viewer.

At times feeling a bit too messaged-focus especially in the light of today’s news, “The Post” nevertheless is another strong example of the newspaper film that exemplifies the honorable duty of the newsman and newswoman.

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