“The Shape of Water” a strange but touching romance

Those who abhor bestiality may do well to avoid “The Shape of Water.” An homage to monster and Hollywood love films as well as a rebuke of male-centric hegemony, “The Shape of Water” is a deft tale of love, passion and intrigue.

Elisa Esposito (Sally Hawkins) is mute, working as a cleaner in a secret government facility, her only friends Zelda (Octavia Spencer), another member of the help, and Giles (Richard Jenkins), her eccentric painter neighbor. When a strange creature from the Amazon is brought in to the lab by supposedly tough-as-nails army man Richard Strickland (Michael Shannon), Elisa forms a special bond with him and a romance starts to brew, one that will change her life forever.

Featuring the gorgeous cinematography that director Guillermo del Toro’s films are known for (provided here by Dan Laustsen), the film is a textbook example of filmmaking wizardry, utilizing framing, composition, color and depth to tell its story.

It is at heart a story about the dreams that fester in our minds, dreams amplified by Hollywood glamour and the movies, dreams of finding love, dancing and feeling absolute happiness, and how those dreams clash with daily reality, where governments try to one up each other and would rather kill an innocent creature rather than let it fall into their competitor’s hands. To Elisa, someone who has never been able to speak and works a menial job, those dreams keep her spirit alive and finding love, even a love with something beyond imagination, is a remarkable experience. Fighting for her dream against the cruelty of man’s world tests her resolve in a dramatic way. Another interesting note are the pressures put on the villain of Richard Strickland. Rather than a one-dimensional stereotype, we see how the stress of being a man’s man gets to him, to provide for his family, to be a winner, to be a man of the future. At one point, he even asks, when is what I do enough to qualify me as a good man? This humanizes him in a strong way that develops greater appreciation for the story’s themes.

Strange, beautiful, stylistic and above all, heartfelt, del Toro’s “The Shape of Water” is a moving love letter to all movies: monster, science fiction, drama, spy thriller and romance.

 

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